House of Stone

House of Stone

A Memoir of Home, Family, and A Lost Middle East

Book - 2012
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"Evocative and beautifully written, House of Stone . . . should be read by anyone who wishes to understand the agonies and hopes of the Middle East." -- Kai Bird, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and author of Crossing Mandelbaum Gate

"In rebuilding his family home in southern Lebanon, Shadid commits an extraordinarily generous act of restoration for his wounded land, and for us all." -- Annia Ciezadlo, author of Day of Honey

In spring 2011, Anthony Shadid was one of four New York Times reporters captured in Libya, cuffed and beaten, as that country was seized by revolution. When he was freed, he went home. Not to Boston or Beirut--where he lives-- or to Oklahoma City, where his Lebanese-American family had settled and where he was raised. Instead, he returned to his great-grandfather's estate, a house that, over three years earlier, Shadid had begun to rebuild.

House of Stone is the story of a battle-scarred home and a war correspondent's jostled spirit, and of how reconstructing the one came to fortify the other. In this poignant and resonant memoir, the author of the award-winning Night Draws Near creates a mosaic of past and present, tracing the house's renewal alongside his family's flight from Lebanon and resettlement in America. In the process, Shadid memorializes a lost world, documents the shifting Middle East, and provides profound insights into this volatile landscape. House of Stone is an unforgettable meditation on war, exile, rebirth, and the universal yearning for home.

Publisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, c2012.
ISBN: 9780547134666
Branch Call Number: 306. 0956 SHA
Characteristics: xviii, 311 p. ; 24 cm.

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dmckenziehague
Jan 20, 2017

I learned from the author, thru his story of life in a small town in Lebanon, the prejudice and rancor of people who cannot move beyond their own small minded self interest. I see the hopelessness in the cultural problems which holds back many to see the big picture. The story of the doctor was very disturbing since he looked to be a crucial figure in the towns history. His altruistic nature was not revered but denigrated. How can a country come together if there is no trust no reverence or understanding of a person on the local level who wants to contribute to society and help people. He is looked at with suspicion.
I think I see why there are so many problems in the middle east. This book was an eye opener for me. I am glad I read it and would recommend others to read it.

ChristchurchLib Dec 12, 2012

"When two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Anthony Shadid visited the abandoned house his great-grandfather had built in southern Lebanon, he decided to restore the nearly 100-year-old two-story abode. In this memoir, he explores renovation, war, home, family, and change. In his great-grandfather's day, Christians (like his relatives) and Muslims resided peacefully together - but for years now, the town has been affected by often-violent conflicts, including 18 years of Israeli occupation. Just before the publication of this "complicated, elegiac, beautiful" (Kirkus Reviews) memoir earlier this year, the amazingly talented Shadid died from an apparent asthma attack while reporting in Syria." Armchair Travel December 2012 Newsletter http://www.nextreads.com/Display2.aspx?SID=5acc8fc1-4e91-4ebe-906d-f8fc5e82a8e0&N=578249

ChristchurchLib Dec 12, 2012

"When two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Anthony Shadid visited the abandoned house his great-grandfather had built in southern Lebanon, he decided to restore the nearly 100-year-old two-story abode. In this memoir, he explores renovation, war, home, family, and change. In his great-grandfather's day, Christians (like his relatives) and Muslims resided peacefully together - but for years now, the town has been affected by often-violent conflicts, including 18 years of Israeli occupation. Just before the publication of this "complicated, elegiac, beautiful" (Kirkus Reviews) memoir earlier this year, the amazingly talented Shadid died from an apparent asthma attack while reporting in Syria." Armchair Travel December 2012 Newsletter http://www.nextreads.com/Display2.aspx?SID=5acc8fc1-4e91-4ebe-906d-f8fc5e82a8e0&N=578249

b
bbst
Jul 07, 2012

I'm really enjoying this book, particularly the perspectives of past and present as told through the author's experience of returning to his ancestral home.

patienceandfortitude Jun 26, 2012

This book is very well written and at times touching, funny, and at other times disturbing. But ultimately I really don't connect with Arab cultures and therefore didn't love the book.

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