Tina's Mouth

Tina's Mouth

An Existential Comic Diary

Graphic Novel - 2011
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In the tradition of Persepolis and American Born Chinese , a wise and funny high school heroine comes of age.

Tina M., sophomore, is a wry observer of the cliques and mores of Yarborough Academy, and of the foibles of her Southern California intellectual Indian family. She's on a first-name basis with Jean-Paul Sartre, the result of an English honors class assignment to keep an "existential diary."

Keshni Kashyap's compulsively readable graphic novel packs in existential high school drama--from Tina getting dumped by her smart-girl ally to a kiss on the mouth (Tina's mouth, but not technically her first kiss) from a cute skateboarder, Neil Strumminger. And it memorably answers the pressing question: Can an English honors assignment be one fifteen-year-old girl's path to enlightenment?
Publisher: New York : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, c2011.
ISBN: 9780618945191
Branch Call Number: YA GRAPHIX KAS
Characteristics: 242 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Additional Contributors: Araki, Mari - Illustrator

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VaughanPLKasey Nov 09, 2016

Tina’s Mouth is presented as the “existential diary” of high school student Tina M., written as an assignment for her advanced honours English class.

The diary is a genuinely charming and insightful look at high school (featuring all the standard characters, from estranged best friend, to unattainable crush), all addressed as a series of letters to Jean-Paul Sartre. Through the diary, Tina struggles with developing a sense of identity, feeling out of place both a school and with her extended family.

The art here is understated black-and-white line drawings, generally unremarkable, but fitting with the premise that this is a high school student’s diary. It’s really Tina’s witty and often sarcastic voice that carries the book, as Kashyap has given this teenager credit for the level of depth and critical thinking skills that many other authors seem reluctant to credit teenagers with.

ChelseaJM Apr 05, 2016

Profound wisdom disguised as a graphic novel for teens. I like totally recommend this light, but heavy book, especially if you're looking for something to read on your lunch breaks. ;)

s
skyekilaen
Sep 10, 2015

Tina Malhotra is writing a diary for her honors philosophy class, because her other options include things like cataloging her garbage every day or videotaping what's in her family's refrigerator. The goal of the diary? To figure out who she is. So, she's writing to Jean-Paul Sartre.

During the school year of the diary, Tina details friend breakups, making new friends, her first crush, her brother's arranged engagement falling apart), and starring in a performance of Rashomon. I couldn't wait to see what happened next with the high school drama, but it was Tina's narration and introspection that made it compelling.

I was concerned that my husband wouldn't get past the premise and would miss out on this hilarious, beautiful, and thoughtful book. Lucky for him, he gave it a chance. It was also lucky for me, because I needed someone to be excited about this book with me. It's so good, aaaahhhhhhh!

Tina's Mouth is a cross between a graphic novel and an illustrated prose novel, wandering from paragraphs to illustrations and often blending the two. I don't know how Araki decided what techniques to use with which sections, but she did a great job varying the density of the pages and keeping the story moving.

Here's hoping Kashyap publishes another book, as I'd love to see what she creates next!

t
TOEFILIGA
Nov 06, 2012

wOW THIS BOOK IS GREAT I JUST WANT TO SAY IF THERE IS A SECOND PART THANK YOU AND ALL YOU OTHER READERS OUT THERE I AM RECOMENDING THIS BOOK TO YOU AND IT IS A WONDERFUL BOOK SO COME TO A LIBRARY IN CHRISCHURCH AND GET THIS BOOK OUT

VanessaCCL Nov 06, 2012

"Illustrated in a clean, minimalist style, Tina's Mouth tells the story of Indian-American Tina M.'s sophomore year at a California private school. As her semester project on existentialism for her honours English class, Tina keeps a diary (addressed to Jean-Paul Sartre, the Father of Existential Thought) that ranges in topic from her "square" older brother's doomed online search for love to her best friend's betrayal to crushes, normal high-school drama, and Tina's own explorations of who she is - and what that means. If you like this honest, often droll, nonchalantly soul-searching read, you might also enjoy Mariko Tamaki's graphic novels Skim and Emiko Superstar." Teen Scene November 2012 newsletter http://www.nextreads.com/Display2.aspx?SID=5acc8fc1-4e91-4ebe-906d-f8fc5e82a8e0&N=565687

lokiboo262 Jul 14, 2012

meh this book wasn't really my cup of tea but hey to each thier own

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