Howl

Howl

A Graphic Novel

Unknown - 2010
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Allen Ginsburg's legendary and groundbreaking epic poem, Howl, is now a graphic novel--a tie-in to the major motion picture starring James Franco. Featuring graphics by acclaimed New Yorker cover artist Eric Drooker, Howl is a magnificent visual interpretation of a classic work by a seminal Beat writer and contemporary of Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs.

Publisher: New York ; Toronto : Harper Perennial, c2010.
ISBN: 9780062015174
Branch Call Number: GRAPHIX 811 GIN
Characteristics: 223 p. : chiefly col. ill. ; 23 cm.
Additional Contributors: Drooker, Eric 1958-- Illustrator

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AL_TINA Dec 14, 2016

I LOVE this poem but just wasn't feeling the graphics in this rendition.

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bookwormjeph
Apr 18, 2016

I have read a few printings of Howl since I first was introduced to it in the 70's but this is the first time I've encountered it in a graphic novel form and I have to say I thoroughly enjoyed it. The artistry captures the essence of the poem beautifully. I may even go buy it just to keep it handy to dip into from time to time.

StratfordLibrary Mar 22, 2013

Blind Date With a Book comment: "Howl is a book that I wouldn't have picked up otherwise but I was very happy to see it. It was a quick read and a great introduction to Ginsberg and the beat poets. Thanks so much for organizing this event!"

AnneDromeda Dec 30, 2010

Graphic novel adaptations of works initially published as text-only books tend to polarize in terms of quality. When they’re well done, the illustrations add something to the reading and open up shades of meaning or characters not immediately apparent in the text. When they’re poorly done, the illustrations can nail down a fluid text to one simplistic reading and limit the reader’s imagination. It’s a risk, and this is a particularly large risk to take with a poem, especially one like Ginsberg’s *Howl*.

Artist Eric Drooker – who also animated portions of the film version – has done a fantastic job with a very daunting task. The illustrations are visually stunning, using sparing, searing flashes of light to illuminate Ginsberg’s grimy critique of mid-20th century American culture and its transformation of essential human value into fungible human capital. When City Lights Bookstore owner Lawrence Ferlinghetti attempted to publish *Howl* in 1956, it was initially banned for obscenity, so it’s no surprise that the graphic novel contains illustrations some parents may deem unsuitable for children. However, even the illustrations of Howl’s more controversial elements are rendered beautifully, in keeping with the poem’s drive to reconsecrate the things mid-century American culture sought to hide, pathologize or sell. Ultimately, Drooker’s frightening dreamscapes update *Howl*’s references and highlight the poem’s continuing relevance. For readers who’ve been curious about graphic novels but are worried they’ll be too light, *Howl* provides a soothingly literary foray into the genre. And, because Drooker has done such a fine job capturing the spirit of Ginsberg’s poem in images, *Howl: A Graphic Novel* is also highly recommended to anyone with an interest in beat culture.

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CryBabe
Jun 10, 2014

CryBabe thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

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AnneDromeda Dec 30, 2010

Graphic novel adaptations of works initially published as text-only books tend to polarize in terms of quality. When they’re well done, the illustrations add something to the reading and open up shades of meaning or characters not immediately apparent in the text. When they’re poorly done, the illustrations can nail down a fluid text to one simplistic reading and limit the reader’s imagination. It’s a risk, and this is a particularly large risk to take with a poem, particularly one like Ginsberg’s *Howl*.

Artist Eric Drooker – who also animated portions of the film version – has done a fantastic job with a very daunting task. The illustrations are visually stunning, using sparing, searing flashes of light to illuminate Ginsberg’s grimy critique of mid-20th century American culture and its transformation of essential human value into fungible human capital. When City Lights Bookstore owner Lawrence Ferlinghetti attempted to publish *Howl* in 1956, it was initially banned for obscenity, so it’s no surprise that the graphic novel contains illustrations some parents may deem unsuitable for children. However, even the illustrations of Howl’s more controversial elements are rendered beautifully, in keeping with the poem’s drive to reconsecrate the things mid-century American culture sought to hide, pathologize or sell. Ultimately, Drooker’s frightening dreamscapes update *Howl*’s references and highlight the poem’s continuing relevance. For readers who’ve been curious about graphic novels but are worried they’ll be too light, *Howl* provides a soothingly literary foray into the genre. And, because Drooker has done such a fine job capturing the spirit of Ginsberg’s poem in images, *Howl: A Graphic Novel* is also highly recommended to anyone with an interest in beat culture.

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